Click on screenshot to zoom
Danger level 8
Type: Trojans
Common infection symptoms:
  • Connects to the internet without permission
  • Installs itself without permissions
  • Slow Computer
  • Slow internet connection

VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA

VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA, also known by its alias names, Trojan.SuspectCRC and TR/Dropper.Gen, is a malicious backdoor Trojan, which is constructed of such treacherous files, which can easily remove active security applications’ processes, act without your authorization and record your personal information. So, if you do not want the horrendous Trojan to control your system and enable hackers to breach your privacy, read this information and remove VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA without researching any further.

VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA is based on the power of two highly cunning executables, which fall under the description of cloaked malware. One of these files is taskman.exe, originally found in C:\Windows or C:\Windows\System32 folders. However, in this particular occurrence, taskman.exe is located under C:\Program Files\Security Task Manager\TaskMan.exe, and simply uses a legitimate name to disguise itself. VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA’s schemers use cloaked components like taskman.exe to mislead Windows system users and make them think that there are no illegitimate files running. Nonetheless, such VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA elements do exist and are are truthfully highly dangerous. Taskman.exe can add and remove processes, hijack certain Windows components and track down your passwords, user names and other similar information, by recording mouse and keyboard activities.

Another cloaked VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA executable is svchost.exe, which in its initial form is responsible for managing such DLL based services as Firewall or Automatic Updates that are responsible for your Windows OS’s security. Originally, svchost.exe is located under C:\Windows\System32, exactly where the fake VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA executable is found, which means that the legitimate element is modified by the Trojan and is not capable of performing its real Windows tasks. And because of removed authentic file’s abilities, the malignant svchost.exe can copy your browsing actions, modify runtime policies, implement browser helper objects, paralyze normal Windows Updates and Firewall maintenance, connect to remote servers, read email and phone book addresses, download malware, and remove the safe mode feature. What is worst about the malignant VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA executable svchost.exe is that it is capable of infecting removable devices connected to your computer, which would allow Trojan to spread to other systems. Amongst other invasion ways, it is likely that your PC has been infected with VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA by the same path as well!

If you have noticed any malignant files (all of which you can see in the table bellow) running in your PC, VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA is definitely processing in the background of your system. And if you have read the report carefully, you will know how harmful this particular Trojan can be to your privacy. So do not hesitate, install reliable security tools and remove VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA instantaneously! Also note that VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA is capable of downloading keyloggers, worms, rogue antispywares and other high-risk malware, which should be removed together with VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA.

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How to manually remove VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA

Files associated with VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA infection:

svchost.exe
bOjrzDV9gm68.exe
svchost.exe
TaskMan.exe
MagicISO 5.4.exe
bOjrzDV9gm68.exe
MagicISO 5.4.exe
TaskMan.exe

VirTool:MSIL/Injector.AA processes to kill:

TaskMan.exe
svchost.exe
TaskMan.exe
MagicISO 5.4.exe
bOjrzDV9gm68.exe
svchost.exe
bOjrzDV9gm68.exe
MagicISO 5.4.exe
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